@kcarruthers

Greetings! This is a where you can find out a bit more about me than is possible to convey in the 160 character one line bio on Twitter.

Just wanted to explain some stuff about how I work with Twitter and where you can find out some more info about me.

@kcarruthers by @firstdogonmoonAs the Twitter bio says “sometimes I feel like being a revolutionary cat” – longer bio information is available on my personal website or LinkedIn.

Please note that I only speak English (quite well) and French (quite badly) so if you tweet primarily in any other languages I’m unlikely to get into discussions with you in your native language.

Here are links to some posts that explain how I use and approach Twitter:

If you already follow me on Twitter, thanks very much! Feel free to tweet @kcarruthers so I can follow you back. Thanks for reading!

Thanks to my colleague Stephen Collins – @trib on Twitter – for the idea for this page!

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4 comments

  1. […] Kate Carruthers pointed out this article about KMart and layaways – the layaway is coming back in style. If you’ve never heard of layaways, it’s because it went out of style probably in the 1980s or so. In the decades following World War II, stores had layaway programs where you paid a portion of the price of an item and when it was fully paid, you went to the store and picked it up. The primary reason layaway went away was the sudden ubiquity of consumer credit cards – easy credit meant everyone could borrow (even if they shouldn’t, like student credit cards) and stores could move inventory quickly. […]

  2. […] coming up and what was said) could have better created a context around what we were then tweeting. Kate Carruthers did some great vox pops using video and in hindsight I’d like to have experimented using […]

  3. […] Kate Carruthers pointed out this article about KMart and layaways – the layaway is coming back in style. If you’ve never heard of layaways, it’s because it went out of style probably in the 1980s or so. In the decades following World War II, stores had layaway programs where you paid a portion of the price of an item and when it was fully paid, you went to the store and picked it up. The primary reason layaway went away was the sudden ubiquity of consumer credit cards – easy credit meant everyone could borrow (even if they shouldn’t, like student credit cards) and stores could move inventory quickly. […]

  4. […] 5% Longbow1221 ( @Longbow1221) 5% Marilyn Clark @marlinex 5% Nathan Taylor @nathanrtaylor 5% Kate Carruthers @kcarruthers 5% katska @katska 5% Ben Rogers @plasmaegg 5% Vikas SN @tsuvik 5% Steve Sorden […]